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Public Papers - 1991 - August

Letter to Congressional Leaders on the Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Export Controls

1991-08-05

Dear Mr. Speaker: (Dear Mr. President:)

1. On April 23, 1991, consistent with the requirements of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.) (``IEEPA''), I reported to the Congress on the exercise of export control authority under Executive Order No. 12730 of September 30, 1990. In that order, I declared a national emergency under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701 et seq.) to deal with the threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States caused by the lapse of the Export Administration Act of 1979, as amended (50 U.S.C. 2401 et seq.).

2. Section 401(c) of the National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1641(c)) requires that the President, within 90 days after the end of each 6-month period following a declaration of a national emergency, report to the Congress on the total expenditures directly attributable to that declaration. This report, covering the 6-month period from September 30, 1990, to March 31, 1991, is submitted in accordance with that requirement.

3. The expenses incurred by the Federal Government in the 6-month period from September 30, 1990, to March 31, 1991, that are directly attributable to the exercise of authorities conferred by the declaration of a national emergency with respect to export controls were largely centered in the Department of Commerce. Expenditures by the Department of Commerce are estimated at ,797,000, most of which represent wage and salary costs for Federal personnel. Personnel costs were largely centered in the Bureau of Export Administration.

4. The unrestricted access of foreign parties to U.S. goods, technology, and technical data and the existence of certain boycott practices of foreign nations, in light of the expiration of the Export Administration Act of 1979, continue to constitute an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security, foreign policy, and economy of the United States. I shall continue to exercise the powers at my disposal to retain the export control system, including the antiboycott provisions, and will continue to report periodically to the Congress.

Sincerely,

George Bush

Note: Identical letters were sent to Thomas S. Foley, Speaker of the House of Representatives, and Dan Quayle, President of the Senate.

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